[Book Review] The Statistical Probability Of Love At First Sight

statistical

I have never believed in love at first sight. Not in the boy-looks-at-girl-and-they-see-that-their-lives-mean-nothing-unless-they-are-together sort of way. Sure, it sometimes works on some very romantic, highly idealist movies, but it always sounded to me more like passion than real love.

Maybe that has to do, though, with what you consider love at first sight to be in the first place. When I first started reading The Statistical Probability Of Love At First Sight (Jennifer E. Smith, paperback by Poppy, 236 pages long), I wasn’t so sure I was going to fall for the characters just as they fall in love with each other – and, when romance is involved, the reader has to fall for the characters or everything sounds fake, plastic, inorganic. I did.

The magic of Smith’s book stands on the fact that it isn’t, despite its title, all about love, and that the love it contains doesn’t happen, in fact, precisely at first sight. The main characters, Hadley and Oliver, aren’t airheads waiting for love to give their life purpose, but people with real concerns, concerns so great they – at least for me – steal the show and make the book worth it all by themselves. Their relationships with their families are very credible and well built, described in a way that isn’t melodramatic (which would make the reader impatient for the romance parts), but has actual feeling. Unlike so many novels that give characters backgrounds just for the sake of filling up space, you can actually observe how these intricate relationships have made the characters who they are and how they affect what they are on the verge of becoming.

The best part of it all is still the romance. Oliver will make any girl swoon in ways he himself probably never imagined, by pure accident, simply because of his charming personality. And what makes this a great love story is the fact that it is, indeed, love, and not pure passion or lust: these characters get to know each other, their flaws included, and only then fall in love. It reminded me of a line from John Green’s The Fault In Our Stars: “as he read, I fell in love the way you fall asleep: slowly, and then all at once”. They slowly get to know each other – even if they do it in a short period of time, nothing is rushed – and fall in love yes, at first sight, but after a very, very good look.

Without any spoilers, I can also say the end is perfect. The only sad thing is that Smith writes so, so well that the reader has no choice but to become attached to these characters, which leaves one longing for more when it’s all over. I find it amusing that prose this simple can be so effective and delicate. As short and basic as it is, it manages to be a beautiful story about love in every meaning, every manner and with every sort of beginning. Love requires friendship, and great friendships do not require much time to happen.

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6 thoughts on “[Book Review] The Statistical Probability Of Love At First Sight

  1. That is such a great review, it makes me want to reread the book! I remember absolutely loving the fact that the story wasn’t only about the love story, despite what the title would have you thinking.
    Have you read her most recent novel, This is What Happy Looks Like? It wasn’t as perfect, but it had a lot of the same strong points as this one. I’m definitely a fan of Jennifer E. Smith now!

  2. I loved this book so damn much. The friendship between Oliver and Hadley, their entire conversation on the plane, the way they find their way back to each other… everything was just so incredible. And the fact that the main fact wasn’t the romance, but both Oliver and Hadley different family issues, just made me love the book even more. I identified with it – the issues were real, possible, and you could feel as they adjusted to everything that was happening around them. Simply amazing. So amazing that I spent about 15 minutes just staring at the ceiling after reading it, with a silly smile on my face. Delicate, yet powerful. Absolutely loved it ❤

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